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ConfigMgr: first impressions deploying a Distribution Point on a server core installation…

02 May

Recently I’ve been investigating deploying server core installations of Windows Server 2012 R2, 2016 and newer. Deploying a server core installation has become more viable for the following reasons:

  • Smaller footprint;
  • More secure, with tools like RSAT, Remote PowerShell and Windows Admin Center a GUI may no longer be required if the workload can run on a server core installation ;
  • Easy to manage with the remote tools mentioned before and requires less updating.

Well, Configuration Manager is one of those tools who remains strongly dependent on a GUI except for the role Disitribution Point, see https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sccm/core/plan-design/configs/supported-operating-systems-for-site-system-servers for more information.

Unfortunately, you will lose the ability to deploy PXE and Multicast since Windows Deployment Services is not available on server core, see https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/windows/it-pro/windows-server-2012-R2-and-2012/hh831764(v=ws.11) and it applies to Windows Server 2016 and newer as well, so you need to use media. I’d recommend using bootable media only since it won’t change that often. This would be terrible in the past. However, image building and deployment has lost its importance with Windows 10 and this is something I noticed as well. Nowadays, I hardly recommend to build reference images and consider just unattended setups including some stuff (drivers, updates, apps and other). The actual deployment may take a bit longer but it provides absolute flexibility.

The only scenario’s where PXE and Multicast are more viable are for mass deployments at places such as schools and universities, but this is just my opinion…

Deploying a Configuration Manager site mostly consists of at least three servers:

  • Site Server & Site Database Server (yes, a locally installed SQL instance);
  • Management Point, SUP, Application Catalogs and others except Distribution Point;
  • Distribution Point.

A Distribution Point is something that I normally don’t protect by some sort of backup mechanism. If a DP is broken, just reinstall and redistribute all content.

OK, so now to my first impressions, here they are:

  • A clean server core installation misses some basic prerequisites, ie. Remote Differential Compression;
  • After adding the server as a Distribution Point, some basic prerequisites are not automatically installed;
  • Data Deduplication works like a charm;
  • distribution of content fails due to the missing prerequisites.

So eventually, this means it’s recommended to install the prerequisites yourself before adding the server as a Distribution Point. Fortunately, this is not so difficult and will prevent a lot of frustration.

After that, it just works the same way as a GUI based server but without the overhead you don’t really need anyway. Except when you need PXE or multicast…

 

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